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8/28/2009 Flag Rockfish Triangle aboard Phil Sammet's RIB by Robert Lee -- [View this report only]
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Bottom Team: Robert Lee, Allison Lee, Kevin Dow
Visibility: 60' Time:12:00 AM
Temp: 50F Surge:  
Scooter: X-scooter Burn Time:  
Max Depth: 226FSW Avg Depth: 220FSW
Bottom Time: 0:25 Total Time: 1:34
Bottom Gases: 15/55Deco Gases:EAN50,O2
Backgas Config: Double HP120Deco Tanks:AL40,AL80
Deco Profile:
 
For reasons unexplained, Allison, Kevin and I decided to revisit the site of our last T2 experience dive, the SS Sand, aka Flag Rockfish triangle.

After spending quite a bit of time going back and forth over the GPS numbers trying to get some kind of relief to register on the depth sounder, we finally threw the hook and took our chances. As we geared up, I kept nervously looking at the drag on the GPS, but Phil assured us that we weren't dragging.

We splashed into a murky layer of 5' viz that went down to about 40' or so, and thick with sea nettles. After clearing about 50' or so, the viz opened up quite nicely to give us clear, dark water all the way down to the bottom. At about 180' or so, we could start to see the many metridium that are growing on the rock pile below, so we were excited that we would at least have something to dive :-)

As soon as we reached the bottom, I came face to face with a large basket star and a vase sponge (or boot sponge for those sticklers out there). We worked the rock pile (which is probably only 5-8' off tall, finding tons of little baby lingcod (some as small as 12-18"). At one point, we took a jaunt out over the sand to look for the mysterious pink worm-like critter we had spotted previously, but we didn't end up finding it. As we headed back to the "reef", I found a crinoid (my first) (though I found out later that a much easier way to see crinoids is to go to British Columbia... :-) )

Deco was spent dodging sea nettles. The top murky layer was much warmer (high 50's), so that was a very welcome way to finish out :-)

Some pictures here.